Health Psychology

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About the Group

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The Health Psychology Research Group has a primary research focus on health behaviours, risk communication and behavioural change. We also work collaboratively with other research groups with an interest in health behaviour for instance: the Ageing Research Group, Wales Diabetes UK, Swansea University and Glamorgan University.

We conduct internationally recognized research and also provide high quality training to practitioners in applied settings. The group has strong links with a range of health service providers including Cardiff Public Health Team, Institute of Medical Genetics and Cardiff and the Vale NHS Trust. HPRG carries out research on a range of projects relevant to our understanding of health behaviour: Alcohol education, abuse and addiction; attitudes and beliefs in food safety; food choices; effects of food on mood and mental performance; risk perception and communication; physical activity; complementary therapies; eating disorders; management of stress and healthy ageing.

Current Research Projects
  • Like mother, like daughter: an inter-generational study of food choices
  • Healthy ageing: The effect of outdoor activities on physiological and physical health
  • Retirement and lifestyle behaviours
  • Combined effects of diet and stress on biological markers of ageing
  • Stress and well-being in the workplace
  • Encouraging physical activity in the workplace
  • Stress in Omani women
  • Evaluating marriage preparation programmes in the Oman
  • An explanation of the social and cultural constructions of adolescent fathers in British society

Training programmes
  • Obesity: Is it all in the mind?
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
  • Anger Management

Research Grants
  • ESRC Funded Seminar Series: Motivational Interventions for treatment engagement and behaviour change

Group Members

Healthy Ageing

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Research Students
  • PhD student, Joann Warner. ADF funded. (DoS, L Sanders; supervisor, P Hewlett and K Morris)


Selected Publications
  • Hobbis, S.(2012). Adjusting to retirement: Changing views of normality. Cardiff Metropolitan University. PhD Thesis.
  • Hobbis, S., Thirlaway, K., Sanders, L. & Hendry, L. (2011). Retirement and lifestyle behaviours: A thematic analysis of a pilot study. Health Psychology Update, 20 (2), 2 - 8.


Group Members

Stress and Well-being

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The group is involved in 3 projects investigating work-related health and well-being. The first project is an evaluation of the impact of a work-based physical activity intervention on physical fitness and psychological well-being in employees who take up the offer of a Health MOT and free gym membership by their employer. The second study is an evaluation of health, well-being and work-related stress in a large organization in South Wales. The third study is an evaluation of an intervention to improve wellbeing in students.

Students
  • PhD: Rachel Dodge

Selected Publications
  • Brookes, K; Limbert, C; Thirlaway, K; Deacy, C; O’Reilly, A and Scott, S. (2013) Systematic review: Work-related stress and the HSE Management Standards. Occupational Medicine doi:10.1093/occmed/kqt078
  • Brookes, K; Peters, J; & Limbert, C (2013) "Evaluating a communications campaign to reduce blood clots", Health Education, Vol. 113 Iss: 6, pp.464 – 475
  • Dodge, R., Daly, A., Huyton, J. & Sanders L.D. (2012) The Challenge of defining wellbeing. The International Journal of Wellbeing. 2(3).
    http://www.internationaljournalofwellbeing.org/index.php/ijow/article/view/89

Collaborators
  • Chris Deacy: Health and Safety Officer

Members

Eating Behaviour, ​Diet, Mood and Performance

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The section of the HPRG is broadly interested in nutritional neuroscience, the effect of dietary factors on mood and cognitive performance. One line of research has focused on caffeine consumption; both the effects of caffeine (and caffeine withdrawal) on mood and mental performance, and personality and lifestyle factors that relate to the consumption of caffeinated drinks. Another area of interest is the effect of patterns of eating (how much and how often) on mood and mental performance.

Selected Publications
  • Brookes, K; Limbert, C; Thirlaway, K; Deacy, C; O’Reilly, A and Scott, S. (2013) Systematic review: Work-related stress and the HSE Management Standards. Occupational Medicine doi:10.1093/occmed/kqt078
  • Brookes, K; Peters, J; & Limbert, C (2013) "Evaluating a communications campaign to reduce blood clots", Health Education, Vol. 113 Iss: 6, pp.464 - 475
  • Prior, A-L., Limbert, C. (2012) Adolescents’ Perceptions and Experiences of Family Meals (accepted for publication in Journal of Child Health Care).
  • Balgrove M. Henley-Einion, J., Barnett, A., Edwards, D & Seage, C. H (2011). A replication of the 5-7 day dream lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as a control for baseline matching. Consciousness and Cognition; 20, 384–391.
  • Limbert, C. (2010) Perceptions of Social Support and Eating Disorder Characteristics. Health Care for Women International. 31:(2)170-8
  • Kloep, M., Hendry, L. B, Gardener, C. and Seage, C. H (2010) Young people’s view of their present and future selves in two deprived communities. Journal of community and applied social psychology.
  • 2009 Hewlett, P. & Smith, A. The effects of meal frequency on mood and cognitive performance. Appetite 52, 245-248.
  • 2007 Hewlett, P. & Smith, A. Effects of repeated doses of caffeine on performance and alertness: new data and secondary analyses. Human Psychopharmacology, Clinical and Experimental 22, 339-350.
  • 2006 Hewlett, P. & Smith, A. Correlates of daily caffeine consumption. Appetite 46, 97-99.
  • 2006 Hewlett, P. & Smith, A. Acute effects of caffeine in volunteers with different patterns of regular consumption. Human Psychopharmacology, Clinical and Experimental 21, 167-180.

Members
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