Welsh Centre for Wine Research

 

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​​​Social Media Usage Amongst Wine Producers: UK Sur​​​vey 2013

Like other industries wine producers sell their product to wholesalers and retailers for sale onto the general public.  However unlike many other industries a further (sometimes very significant) proportion of their income comes from direct sales at the winery of wine and wine-related products; in an increasing number of  instances these sales have been enhanced by the development of on-line ‘. 

These shops take many forms and use differing technologies to support them. Currently however very little is known about which contribute most effectively to which type of winery/vineyard.  The purpose of this international project is to try to identify the ‘best fit’ synergies  so that wineries/vineyards can tailor their offering more efficiently towards their customers needs and thereby provide a better shopping experience for the consumer and increased profit for the winery / vineyard.​

This is an international project involving universities and wine producers in France, Italy, Spain, Germany, Australia, New Zealand, USA, Canada, South Africa, Austria, Hungary Argentina, Chile, Greece, China and the UK.  We will be very happy to share the results with all participants.

We would be very grateful if you could take the time to complete the questionnaire, but participation is entirely voluntary and at your discretion.

If you would like to take part in this survey please ​click here you will be asked to confirm that you:

  • understand what the project is about and are happy to participate in it

  • your vineyard / winery is in the UK

  • are over 18


Red, White or Rosé?  An investigation into consumer attitudes towards colou​​​​r in wine using Rosé as a case study

There is evidence that choice of wine in some social situations may be driven by image of the wine rather than taste preference.  For example much research suggests that red wine is perceived as a more masculine drink than white wine therefore when ordering wine for themselves in a bar or other non-food environment a man is more likely to order red wine and a women white.  Traditionally, however, both red and white are consumed by both men and women at meals.  Given the current rise in popularity in rosé wines the question arise – how is it perceived and how does that perception impact upon its purchase and consumption?

The purpose of this paper is to study the cultural context of interaction with wine using rosé wine as a case study because there is very little research into this wine style.  The study hopes to establish how perceptions of rosé wine impact upon consumption of it, identifying whether these are national, culturally specific, behaviours or universally common interactions. It is intended that this knowledge will add to/ reflect upon our current consumption behaviours in relation to wine and food.​

This is an international study involving universities from France, USA, New Zealand, Australia, and the UK.  We will be very happy to share the results with all participants.

We would be very grateful if you could take the time to complete the questionnaire, but participation is entirely voluntary and at your discretion.

If you would like to take part in this survey please click here