Welsh institutions arrange huge boost for medical and public health students across Africa

​01/09/2016

​Cardiff Met’s Prof George Karani (second from left) presents Public Health Wales educational materials to staff at Kenya Medical Training College.

Cardiff Met’s Prof George Karani (far right) presents Public Health Wales educational materials to staff at University of Nairobi, School of Physical Sciences.​

​Cardiff Metropolitan University and Public Health Wales have teamed up to help students and staff at universities across Africa.

Public Health Wales has donated a comprehensive range of specialist books and journals – as well as paying for shipping – to a total of six universities and colleges in Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Cameroon.

The donated education resources include copies of the British Medical Journal, public health manuals as well as nursing and infectious diseases journals.

The African universities are all active members of Cardiff Met's African Partnership Initiative (API).

Established in 1995, the API organises joint activities in areas of environmental public health research, staff exchange visits, community projects, community health worker training, workshops and conferences. At home, the partnership has also seen Cardiff School of Health Sciences develop strong links with Cardiff and Vale and Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Boards.

Public Health Wales' books and journals have been sent to medical and public health students and staff at the following institutions: University of Nairobi, Kenya; Kenya Medical Training College (KMTC); Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT), Kenya; Makerere University School of Public Health, Uganda; University of Rwanda College of Medicine; and University of Yaounde1, Cameroon.

In Kenya, the educational materials were presented to University of Nairobi, KMTC and JKUAT by Cardiff Met's Professor George Karani and Nicola Brabyn from Cardiff Met's International department.

Peter K Tum, Director of Kenya Medical Training College commented:

"On behalf of Kenya Medical Training College, I wish to register our appreciation for the donation of various textbooks and manuals donated by you. This will go a long way in supporting our students and staff in accessing references in the relevant titles. The books and journals will be placed in our resource centre that is accessed by over 4,000 students based in our Nairobi campus alone.

"KMTC is a national institution with over 28,000 students spread over 55 campuses based in virtually all the counties in Kenya. The beneficiaries of this kindness included all those students who in one way or another may access the Nairobi resource centre at one time or another. The references will also assist our lecturers to deliver our various curricula."

Isabel Puscas, Senior Evidence and Knowledge Analyst at Public Health Wales, said:

"The organisation is in the process of moving all staff based in various office locations across South East Wales to a single base in Capital Quarter, Cardiff.  The move has meant we've needed to downsize resources and a major stock revision of our library collections has provided the opportunity to donate a number of textbooks and journals to partner institutions in Africa."

Daniel Thomas, Epidemiologist for Public Health Wales, added:

"I have worked with Professor Karani at Cardiff Metropolitan University for many years and have supported the Cardiff School of Health Sciences in its partnership work with African public health institutions.  These links allowed us to organise the donation of these resources to institutions in Africa, and we hope that this will assist in the education and training of the public health professionals of the future."

Professor George Karani from Cardiff School of Health Sciences commented:

"Over the past 22 years, Cardiff Met has fostered strong working relationships with a number of African universities as part of the hugely successful African Partnerships Initiative – a project which supports the Welsh Government's International Development Strategy.

"We now hope that staff and students can benefit from this generous donation from Public Health Wales over the coming years as part of their learning, teaching and research."

Cardiff Met's Pro Vice Chancellor (International), Professor Mohamed Loutfi, commented:  

"Cardiff Met has been actively recruiting international students from Africa to come and study at Cardiff Met for many years. It is now great to see further success in developing the relationship with Africa along with Cardiff School of Health Sciences and Public Health Wales. I hope that this arrangement will benefit students studying medical and public health disciplines and that many careers will be enhanced from such a partnership."