Professor Gareth Irwin

 

Professor, Head of ​​​Biomechanics & Lab Director

​Telephone number: 029 2041 7274
Email address: 

Gareth is a Professor and Head of Sports Biomechanics at Cardiff Metropolitan University. His two research interests are coaching-biomechanics interface and Sports Medicine and Injury. His background as a former International Gymnast and National Coach richly informs his research. Gareth is President and Fellow of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sport. He has over 130 peer-reviewed publications and has delivered 30 National and International invited presentations. He reviews for the EPSRC, Royal Society and many academic journals. Gareth's university collaborators include Cambridge, Cardiff, Penn State, Osaka, Harvard Medical School and Sports University Cologne.  Gareth is currently working with the Welsh Sports Council, FIFA and the IRB.
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Research / Publications

Philosophy
My research philosophy is driven by a desire to understand and explain sporting performance using grounded scientific methods to address meaningful questions that inform researchers, coaches, performers and clinicians. There are two themes which reflect this philosophy: The coaching biomechanics interface and Sports medicine and injury. The first theme examines research questions aimed at making training more effective and efficient, and ultimately embedding scientific rigour within the coaching environment. The second examines the role of the sports clinician and examines the underlying mechanisms associated with the aetiology of injury. In particular it seeks to explain how biological failures result from internal and external loading associated with abnormal segmental orientations. Ecological validity permeates my research. This facilitates and underpins the transfer of research findings into practical settings and applications. My overall philosophy has attracted collaboration with like-minded academics locally, nationally and internationally. Measures of the success of this approach can be seen in the growth of the school’s ‘Sports Biomechanics Research Group’, the securing of cherished research funding and my recognition at national and international levels through awards, invitations, outputs and international committee memberships. 


List of Publications

Strutzenberger, G., Moore, J., Griffiths, H., Schwameder, H. and Irwin, G. (in press). Effects of kinesio tape on fatigue in rugby players. European Journal of Sports Science

Farana, R., Irwin, G., Jandacka, D., Uchytil J, Mullineaux, D.R. (in press). Elbow joint variability for different hand positions of the round off in gymnastics. Human Movement Sciences

Charalambous, L., Lieres und Wilkau, H.C., Potthast, W., and Irwin, G. (in press) Effects of artificial surface temperature on mechanical properties and player kinematics during landing and acceleration, Journal of Sports and Health Science.

Irwin, G., Exell, T.A., Manning, M.L., Kerwin, D.G. (2014). Biomechanical evolution of the Tkachev on uneven bars in female gymnastics. International Biomechanics, 1:1, 21-28

Strutzenberger G., Man-Coa, H., Koussev, J., Potthast, W., and Irwin, G. (2014). Effects of turf on the cutting movement of female soccer players, Journal of Sports and Health Science.

Williams, G.K.R., Irwin, G., Kerwin, D.G. and Newell, K.M. (2014). Biomechanical energetics analysis of technique during learning the longswing on high bar. Journal of Sports Sciences.

Williams, G.K.R., Irwin, G., Kerwin, D.G. and Newell, K.M. (2014). Changes in joint kinetics during learning the longwing on high bar. Journal of Sports Sciences.

Farana, R., Jandacka, D., Uchytil J, Zahradnik, D., Irwin, G.,  (2014). Musculoskeletal loading during the round-off in female gymnastics: The effect of hand position, Sports Biomechanics.  

Kerwin, D.G., Fleming, S., Bezodis, I., Irwin, G., Kuntze, G., Hailes. S. and Kalra, D. (in press). Ownership and control of athlete training and performance data: it’s time for decisions. Journal of Sports Science.

Gittoes, M.J.R., Irwin, G. and Kerwin, D.G. (2013). Landing strategy transference in fundamental backward rotating gymnastic dismounts. Journal of Applied Biomechanics.

Farana, R., Jandacka, D. and Irwin, G. (2013). Influence of different hand positions on impact forces and elbow loading during the round off in gymnastics: A case study. Science of Gymnastics Journal.

Gittoes, M.J.R. and Irwin, G. (2012). Biomechanical approaches to understanding the potentially injurious demands of gymnastic-style impact landings. Sports, Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology, 4(4), 1-12.

Exell, T., Gittoes, M.R.J., Irwin. G. and Kerwin, D.G. (2012). Considerations of force plate transitions on centre of pressure calculation for maximal velocity sprint running. Sports Biomechanics, 11(4), 532-541.

Exell, T., Gittoes, M.R.J., Irwin. G. and Kerwin, D.G. (2012). Gait asymmetry: composite scores for mechanical analyses of sprint running. Journal of Biomechanics 45(6), 1108-1111.

Exell, T., Irwin. G., Gittoes, M.R.J. and Kerwin, D.G (2012). Implications of intra-limb variability on asymmetry analyses. Journal of Sport Sciences,30(4), 403-409.

Williams, G., Irwin, G., Kerwin, D.G. and Newell, K. M. (2012). Kinematic changes during learning the longswing on high bar. Sports Biomechanics, 11(1), 20-33.

Charalambous, L., Irwin, G., Bezodis, I. N. and Kerwin, D. (2012). Lower limb joint kinetics and ankle joint stiffness in the sprint start push-off. Journal of Sports Sciences, 30(1), 1-9.   

Harle, R., Taherian, S., Pias, M., Coulouris, G., Hopper, A., Cameron, J., Lasenby, J., Kuntze, G., Bezodis, I., Irwin, G. and Kerwin D.G. (2012). Towards real-time proling of sprints using wearable pressure sensors. Computer Communications, 33(6), 650-660.

Manning, M.L., Irwin, G., Gittoes M.J.R. and Kerwin, D.G. (2011). Influence of longswing technique on the kinematics and key release parameters of the straddle Tkachev on uneven bars. Sports Biomechanics, 10(3), 161-173.

Gittoes, M.J.R., Irwin, G., Kerwin, D.G. and Mullineaux, D.R. (2011). Variability of impact mechanics during forward and backward rotating dismounts from beam: implications for injury. Journal of Sport Sciences,  29(10), 1051-1058.

Gittoes, M.J.R., Irwin, G., Mullineaux, D. and Kerwin, D.G. (2011). Whole-body and multi-joint kinematic control strategy variability during backward rotating dismounts from beam. Journal of Sports Sciences, 29(10), 1051-1058.

Kerwin. D.G. and Irwin, G. (2010). Musculoskeletal work preceding the outward and inward Tkachev on uneven bars in artistic gymnastics. Sports Biomechanics, 9(1), 16-28.

Taherian, S., Pias, M., Harle. R., Coulouris, G., Hay, S., Cameron, J., Lasenby, J., Kuntze, G., Bezodis, I., Irwin, G. and Kerwin, D. (2010). Profiling sprints using on-body sensors. 8th IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops (PERCOM Workshops). Mannheim, Germany. 444-449.

Jones, P.L., Kerwin, D.G., Irwin, G. and Nokes, L.D.M. (2009). Three dimensional analysis of knee biomechanics when landing on natural turf and football turf. Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering, 29(4), 184-188

Irwin, G. and Kerwin, D.G. (2009). The influence of the vaulting table on the handspring front somersault. Sports Biomechanics. 8(2), 114-128.

Irwin, G. and Kerwin, D.G. (2007). Musculoskeletal work of high bar progressions. Sports Biomechanics, 6(3), 360-373.

Irwin, G. and Kerwin, D.G. (2007). Inter-segmental co-ordination of high bar progressions. Sports Biomechanics, 6(2), 129-142.

Trewartha, G., Bezodis, N., Wilson. C. and Irwin, G. (2007). The control of rotation during rugby union goal kicking. Sports Biomechanics, 6(2), 171-186.

Robbins, M., Wheat, J., Irwin, G. and Bartlett, R. (2006). The changes in movement variability with shooting distance in basketball. Human Movement Studies, 50, 217-238.

Irwin, G., Hanton, S. and Kerwin, D.G. (2005). The conceptual process of progression development in artistic gymnastics. Journal of Sports Sciences, 23(10), 1089-1099.

Irwin, G. and Kerwin, D.G. (2005). Biomechanical similarities of progressions for the longswing on high bar. Sports Biomechanics, 4(2), 164-178.

Irwin, G. Hanton, S. and Kerwin, D.G. (2004). Reflective practice and the origins of elite coaching knowledge. Reflective Practice, 5(3), 425-442.

Teaching and Supervision

Academic leadership
Head of Biomechanics,  (2000- to date)
Director of the Biomechanics Laboratory, (2000- to date)
Discipline Director, (2000- 2012)
Module Leader Level 6 Biomechanics (2000- to date)
 (Previously been module leader for all biomechanics modules at levels 4, 5, 6, and M)

Current teaching profile:
Biomechanics of Sport – levels 4, 5, 6
Biomechanics of Injury and Sports Medicine - MSc
Theoretical and Experimental Biomechanics - MSc
Gymnastics – levels 4, 5, 6

Completed postgraduate research students

Mark Samuels*, MPhil : The biomechanics of advanced skill development on high bar in men’s gymnastics. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Dr Marianne Gittoes and Professor David G Kerwin.  Completed Summer 2009.

Tim Exell, PhD: The biomechanics of technique development in sprinting: The coaching-biomechanics interface.Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University.  Co-supervised by Dr Marianne Gittoes and Professor David G Kerwin. (EPSRC funded PhD studentship).  Completed November 2010.

Laura Charalambous, PhD: Biomechanical feedback for enhancing sprint performance and technique. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Dr Ian Bezodis, Professor David G Kerwin and Professor Steven Hailes (UCL). Completed October 2012.

Genevieve Williams*, PhD: Biomechanical changes during learning a gross complex motor skill. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Professor David G Kerwin and Professor Karl Newell. Completed November 2012.

Philippa Jones, PhD: The biomechanics of return-to-play in professional football injury rehabilitation Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Professor David G Kerwin and Professor Len Nokes (Cardiff University). Completed March 2014

Maximilian Wdowski, PhD: Short-term biomechanical adaptation in field sport sprinting. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Dr Marianne Gittoes, Professor Len Nokes (Cardiff University). Completed June 2014.

Ben Rosenblatt*, PhD: Biomechanical specificity of Olympic lifting for sprint training. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by and Professor David G Kerwin and Dr Cassie Wilson (University of Bath). Completed October 2014.

Michelle Manning*, PhD: Factors influencing the performance of the Tkachev on uneven bars. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Dr Marianne Gittoes and Professor David G Kerwin. Completed November 2014.   

Supervision of postgraduate research students

Hannah Wyatt, PhD: Age-related spinal biomechanics of female gymnasts. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Dr Marianne Gittoes. Estimated completion date summer 2015.

Laurie Needham, PhD*: The influence of task constraints and training drills during the approach phase of pole vaulting. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised Dr Ian Bezodis. Estimated completion date summer 2018.

Adam Brazil, PhD*: The influence of task constraints and training drills during the approach phase of pole vaulting. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised Dr Tim Exell and  Dr Cassie Wilson (University of Bath). Estimated completion date summer 2018.

Tom Rusga, PhD*: The development of a graphical user interface for effective feedback in artistic gymnastics. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised Co-supervised by Professor Karl Newell and Dr Genevieve Williams. Completed November 2017.

Hans Christian von Lieres und Wilkau, PhD: Sprint Biomechanics. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised Dr Ian Bezodis. Estimated completion date summer 2017.
Melanie Golding*, MPhil: The influence of biomechanical methodology on the evaluation of release skills on high bar in men’s artistic gymnastics. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Dr Ian Bezodis, advisor Professor David G Kerwin. Estimated completion date summer 2016.

Steven Buzza*, MPhil: The effect of task demands on kinematic and kinetic variables in golf driving performance. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Dr Ian Bezodis. Estimated completion date summer 2017.

Abigail Ridge*, MPhil: The role of social support in the coach-athlete dyad in female artistic gymnastics. Student registered at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Co-supervised by Dr Ian Mitchell and Dr Mikell Mellick. Estimated completion date September 2014.

Qualifications and Awards

Head of Biomechanics & Laboratory Director
Professor (Cardiff School of Sport, Cardiff Metropolitan University)

Visiting Professor (Human Motion Diagnostic Centre, University of
Ostrava, Czech Republic)

Research Associate, Sport Research Institute New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology

President of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sport

Elected member of the Welsh Livery Company

Research awards
Awarded Fellow of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sport (FISBS), International Society of Biomechanics in Sports, (2009).

Hans Gros New Investigator Award, International Society of Biomechanics in Sports, (2006). Awarded for the presentation and defence of a paper entitled ‘Musculoskeletal work of high bar progressions’ in collaboration with Professor D.G. Kerwin.

Co-author for Dr Roman Farana: New Investigator Award, International Society of Biomechanics in Sports, (2013). Awarded for the presentation and defence of a paper entitled ‘Biomechanics of hand placement in the round off in’

National
BASES Emerging Researcher Medal Competition, (2009): Sports Performance. This prestigious medal is a mid-career award developed to identify and recognise the ‘stars’ of sport and exercise science research.

Trustees of Headley Court (Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre) Research Prize, (2007). Headley Court, England. Awarded for the presentation and defence of a paper entitled ‘Effects of bilateral and unilateral semi-grid ankle orthoses on ankle stability and ground contact kinetics’ in collaboration with Lt Col Gareth Thomas and Professor D.G. Kerwin

External Links

Formal national and international research links The following provides evidence of my extensive collaborations, highlighting my internationalisation and the academic quality of my research projects.

 

Sensing for sports and managed exercise, SESAME (2006-2010)
This major multidisciplinary research project was EPSRC funded (£3.7m) and brought together experts from University of Cambridge (Computer Sciences Department, Engineering Department), The Royal Veterinary College (Biomechanical Research Lab), UCL (Computer Sciences Department, Human Informatics Department), and Cardiff Metropolitan University (Sports Biomechanics Research Group). The SESAME consortium investigated the use of wireless sensor-based systems with offline and real-time processing and feedback to enhance the performance of elite athletes and young athletes who have been identified as having world class potential. The overall goals of the project lay in enhancing performance, improving coach education and advancing sports science using a range of both hardware and software technologies.  The research builds on extensive experience both within and outside the consortium in the application of sensor systems to human and animal monitoring. The advancements knowledge was seen in terms of specific sporting application and computer science fundamentals.

One turf: A global multi-sport artificial surface (2011- on going)
This project aligns itself with the Exercise and Health Agenda, a worldwide concept aimed at using sport and physical activity to promote health and well-being. Initially funded by the International Rugby Board (IRB) (£120k) the research aims to examine sports and recreational activities involving player-surface interaction. Natural turf pitches customised to the needs of individual sports have limitations; and using artificial turf is an alternative for providing a durable, flexible and cost effective solution that can offer usable playing surfaces across the globe. The concept of developing a single artificial turf to address the majority of users’ needs is an attractive one for sport, commerce and local authorities. Biomechanics, epidemiology, soft tissue tribology, injury profiling and psychological aspects of player involvement together with improved mechanical testing which reflects player-surface interactions will form the heart of the research.  The outcomes of the research will also be appealing commercially by offering governing bodies and manufacturers the potential to increase their global market. Key partners include Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), National Football League (NFL), International Hockey Federation (FIH), Gaelic Athletics Association (GAA), as well as Cardiff University and the German Sports University of Cologne (Institute for Biomechanics and Orthopaedics). The ‘One Turf’ project in association with the IRB has led to the submission of a research application to the Marie Curie Industry-Academia Partnerships and Pathways (IAPP) £800k (under review) and is developing a Horizon 2020 EU grant (£5m – under development). 

Player-surface interactions: perceptions in elite football (2012 - on going)
This project is funded by Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) (€100,000). Building on previous research that has examined physiological and biomechanical responses (Surface and Fatigue testing: FIFA, £250k) this project centres on the player’s perception and the psychological issues associated with performing on different surfaces. This project aims to examine elite player perception of performing on a variety of surfaces during football specific manoeuvres. The overall purpose is to provide further insights into the players’ psychological processes in order to strengthen the current body of literature surrounding player-surface interactions. Player perception can be seen therefore as central when attempting to win the hearts and minds of the footballing community over the introduction of artificial turf; a desire that has been publicly communicated by the international governing body of football. Key partners include FIFA, Cardiff University, LABOsport (turf test institute) and Parma FC.

Kinesio-taping and performance (2012 – on going)
This study is a significant collaboration with a European partner at the University of Salzburg (Department of Sport Science and Kinesiology), Austria. This project emerged from a topical issue from physiotherapy whereby taping in certain sports has become more than just an injury prevention mechanism. Taping, particularly kinesio-taping, has become popular in athletes aiming to improve their performance as it may influence muscle strength and blood circulation. Due to these aspects kinesio-taping could also affect muscle fatigue and relative power production. Therefore, the aim of this research study was to identify the effect of kinesio-taping on performance outcome and relative power contribution of the hip, knee and ankle joint in rested and fatigued situation.

Amputee physical rehabilitation system (HomeHab) (2012 – on going)
Patients (civilian and military) who have lower limb amputations undergo a lengthy process of rehabilitation to enhance physical and cognitive function. The process involves frequent visits to specialised units, to undergo examination and monitoring by multidisciplinary teams of specialist physiotherapists, orthopedic surgeons, clinical biomechanists and medical engineers. The process can take up to three years before functionality is maximised. The ability to monitor patients using meaningful clinically relevant metrics associated with the development of functionality over long periods of time would provide the opportunity for clinicians to make off-sight assessments and objective decisions regarding patient care. This project forms collaboration with the University of Cambridge (Computer Sciences Department), University of Salzburg (Department of Sport Science and Kinesiology) and the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre (Headley Court).  The aims of the HomeHab project are to provide i) home-based accurate bio-mechanical analysis to facilitate regular, quantitative assessment away from the medical centre; ii) continuous (all-day) monitoring of movement; and iii) automated motion assessment and feedback. The project envisages an instrumented room within the patient’s home where the medical practitioner can quantitatively assess the patient’s movements and provide immediate corrections. Body sensors on the patient will be used to train a machine learning system to recognise the difference between a correct and incorrect movement (e.g. desired and ‘old’ gait). Outside of the instrumented room these sensors will provide a full log of the patient’s activity levels, immediate reminders to the patient if they slip into bad habits (e.g. adopt the ‘old’ gait) and low-latency feedback to the practitioner about how well the rehabilitation process is proceeding.  The project (HomeHab) has resulted in an application for Erwin-Schrödinger-Auslandsstipendium des FWF (Academic Mobility Funding for foreign study) This will fund a research fellow for 24 months (€68k) working in the Sports Biomechanics Research Group in Cardiff. The central aim of the research fellowship is to develop a proposal and body of research for HomeHab and then apply for funding. Initial seed corn funding applications have been submitted to the BBSRC (£750k). HomeHab will bring together a variety of new but proven technologies including depth cameras such as those found in the Microsoft Kinect platform for remote biomechanical assessment, body sensor networks for continuous monitoring and machine learning techniques for automated assessment and activity monitoring.

Biomechanical indicators of spinal injury in female gymnastics(2011-2014)
This research brings collaboration between the Sports Biomechanics Research Group, Harvard Medical School and the Sports Council for Wales. Over the past decade young competitive female gymnasts have been shown to be susceptible to acute and chronic lower back injuries, which may partially be attributed to low age participation and musculo-skeletal immaturity. The aim of this research is to develop understanding of the age-related biomechanics of trunk stability in competitive female gymnasts executing complex skills. The overall purpose of the research is to gain insight into key biomechanical indicators that may be used to facilitate gymnast-centric injury screening and performance development of young female gymnasts. An advisor to the project is Professor Lyle J. Micheli (Professor of Pediatric Sports Medicine, Harvard Medical School). The project has secured £60k, which is funding a full time PhD student (Hannah Wyatt).
Biomechanical indicators of performance in sprint running (2013-2016)
This research brings collaboration between the Sports Biomechanics Research Group, and Sport Wales. Recently securing funding (£60k) which will be used to fund a full time PhD student (appointment pending). The aim of this research is to develop understanding of the athlete-specific biomechanics of sprinting in elite athletes. The overall purpose of the research is to gain an insight into the key biomechanical indicators that may be used to develop athlete-centred training programmes in order to improve performance in elite sprinters. This research, which is still in the planning stage, combines the expertise of Dr Ian Bezodis in sprint biomechanics; Ian has worked with the GB Olympic athletics squad building up to the 2004 and 2008 Olympic Games, working with a range of athletes in the speed events. This project will utilise grounded, research driven data to inform the coaching process and make training more effective and efficient. 

Development of complex skills: motor control (2007 – on going)
This project forms collaborations with world leaders in motor control; Professor Newell (Penn State University), and Professors van Emmerik and Hamill (University of Massachusetts).  The aim of this research is to investigate the application of the theories of motor control in an ecologically valid environment. Specifically, underpinned by dynamical systems theory and using sport as the mechanism, the project explores the areas of biological variability and changes in coordination during skill learning. Outputs from this project include peer review publication, invited presentations and most recently a PhD completion (Genevieve Williams). Dr Genevieve Williams is now progressing this area through a funded postdoctoral research programme, in which Genevieve will be spending approximately four months each in Cardiff, Massachusetts, and Penn State. In parallel, from September 2013 a new PhD student (currently self-funded) will extend this research theme. Major advances in the methodological approaches used to examine biological variability have been developed by this group, and are currently under journal review in Human Movement Sciences. The research outcomes from this project are and will continue to be world leading, and provide a platform to obtain future funding.
                                     
Brazilian-Cardiff sports research project (2012 – on going)
In collaboration with the University of São Paulo and Universidade Estadual Paulista this project brings together a multidisciplinary team to examine issues associated with sport. The group of Brazilian researchers includes experts in biomechanics (Professor Luis Mochizuki, University of São Paulo), sociology (Professor Laurita Marconi Schiavon, Universidade Estadual Paulista) and pedagogy (Dr Michele Carbinatto, University of São Paulo). The professors are initially visiting in the Summer 2013 to outline the research projects with other colleagues in these areas (Dr’s Stewart, Bryant and Mitchell). This will be followed by a longer 6-8 months research placement early in 2014.  Funding for this is being gained locally from the respective universities as well as Science Without Borders. In addition to this I have recently recruited a fully funded PhD student for 2014 to undertake research into fatigue in gymnastic performance who will gain funding through the Science Without Borders Brazilian Government Scholarship Fund. This research aligns its self with the UK governments and Cardiff Metropolitan Universities desire to engage with Brazil commercially, politically and through Higher Education.

Elbow injury in female gymnastics (2012 – on going)
This collaboration stems from my interest in gymnastics and injury, with a specific focus on injury in female gymnastics being very prevalent particularly in the upper extremities (wrist, elbow and shoulder). This project forms a formal collaboration with the University of Ostrava (Human Motion Diagnostic Centre). Having access to the female Czech Republic Olympic squad provided a unique sample, which has allowed detailed biomechanical analysis to be undertaken in controlled conditions. The project has already resulted in four publications and a recent personal invitation to present our findings to the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy and Sport Medicine (Cardiff, April 2013) and Human Movement (Czech Republic, June 2013).

Amputee running: biomechanical determinants of performance (2012 – on going)
This research project is in the initial stages of development and brings together The German Sports University of Cologne (Institute for Biomechanics and Orthopaedics), University of Southampton (School of Electronics and Computer Science) and Cardiff Metropolitan University (Sport Biomechanics Research Group). Building on from the group's earlier research on able-bodied and amputee athletes (Bezodis et al., 2013; Bezodis et al., 2010; Brüggemann et al., 2008), this project will aim to examine the limiting factors associated with running with a blade, effects of different amputations (above and below knee), issues of asymmetry (bi- and uni-lateral amputees) and different styles of prostheses. This research will aim to identify the biomechanical determinants of successful performance and produce meaningful information that can inform coaches, scientists and clinicians. A postgraduate student has been recruited to undertake this project (Hans von Lieres und Wilkau) and will initially be based in Cologne developing techniques of 3D measurement for prostheses. Recruitment of athletes has already begun with a large sample of UK based amputee sprinters signed up. Potential funding is being sought through commercial links and EU sources over the next 12 – 18 months. 
External  examining and other work with external bodies, institutions, etc.

At UK level I have acted as an external advisor validating degrees at the University of Plymouth (Management & Sport & Exercise Sciences: 2005) and University of Exeter (FdSc in Sports Coaching and Exercise, Health and Fitness: 2012).

External Examiner Positions
University of Portsmouth: BSc(Hons) Sport and Exercise  Sciences, (2013-2017)
University of Lincoln:       BSc(Hons) Sport and Exercise  Sciences, (2012-2016)
University of Plymouth:    FdSc. Management & Sport & Exercise Sciences, (2005-2009)
                   FdA. Sports Development, (2005-2009)
       FdA. Sport, Recreation and Facility Management, (2005-2009)

This academic year, in line with the European union’s convergence for economic transformation social fund, I am managing and leading a series of Sport and Exercise Biomechanics Workshop’s for further education and foundation degree level.  Partners include Exeter and Plymouth University as well as Cornwall and Truro Colleges. The aim of these workshops is to share up to date research and teaching practice in sport and exercise biomechanics.

Research degree examinations

External Examiner (National)
Yanjia Gu (2014), PhD: Limits to temporal synchronisation in fundamental finger actions, Student registered at Loughborough University, UK. Supervisor: Dr Mike Hiley, Dr Matthew Pain

Sian Armstrong (2013), PhD: Use of technology in the assessment of rower physiology, Student registered at Cardiff University, UK. Supervisor: Professor Len Nokes.

Simon Fothergill (2013), PhD re examination: Automatic assessment of kinaesthetic performance applied to rowing. Student registered at Jesus College, University of Cambridge, UK. Supervisor: Professor Andrew Hopper.

Simon Fothergill (2012), PhD: Automatic assessment of kinaesthetic performance applied to rowing. Student registered at Jesus College, University of Cambridge, UK. Supervisor: Professor Andrew Hopper.

Tanya LaSage (2011), PhD: A wireless sensor system for monitoring the motion of swimmers. Student registered at Loughborough University, UK. Supervisor: Professor Andrew West.

External Examiner (International)

Anna Lorimer (2014), PhD: “Stiffness of the lower limb ‘springs’ as a multifactorial measure of Achilles tendon injury risk”. Student registered at Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Supervisor: Professor Patria Hume, Dr Simon Pearson (High Performance Sport New Zealand), Dr Justin Keogh (Bond University)

Stephen Hollings (2014), PhD: The Transition from Elite Junior Athlete to Successful Senior Athlete-Implications for Athletics High Performance Programmes. Student registered at Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Supervisor: Professor Patria Hume, Associate Professor Cliff Mallett and Professor William Hopkins

Lisa McDonnell (2013), PhD: The effect of stroke rate on performance in flat-water sprint kayaking. Student registered at Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Supervisor: Professor Patria Hume. 

Helen Crewe (2013), PhD: The biomechanics of lower back injury in cricket. Student registered at The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Supervisor: Professor Jacqueline Alderson.  

Ashley Pedler (2012), PhD: The biomechanics of drop punt: three-dimensional kinematics, variability and muscle activity. Student registered at University of Southern Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. Supervisor: Professor Paul Grimshaw.

Toshiyuki Fujihara (2011), PhD: Biomechanical evaluation of circles with a suspended aid. Student registered at University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Supervisor: Professor Pierre Gervais.

International Masters

Ariel Jane Edesess  (2014),International Masters: Limits to Temporal Synchronization in Fundamental Hand and Finger Actions. Student registered at the University of Limerick, Ireland. Supervisor: Dr Drew Harrison.

Nicholas Blackah (2011),International Masters: The effect of exercise induced muscle damage on shock dissipation during treadmill running. Student registered at the Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. Supervisor: Dr Elizabeth Bradshaw.

Sporting / Coaching Profile

Coaching
Wales Men’s Team Coach, (1998 – 2003)
GB Men’s Team Coach, (2003); World University Games, Daegu, South Korea
GB Gymnastics Team Manager, (2003, 2005 and 2007); World University Games
Elected member of the British Universities Gymnastics Management team, (2005 – to date)
GB Gymnastics Tutor, (2000 – to date)
 
Performance
Men’s Welsh Champion, (1993-1996)
International Men’s Artistic Gymnast Wales, (1990-1998)
Commonwealth Games, (1994), Victoria, Canada
World University Games, (1995), Fukuoka, Japan
Commonwealth Games, (1998), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 
World University Games, (1997), Sicily, Italy